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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the borders of this hallowed land. together today we meet to celebrate this democracy, lord, with which you have blessed us and we assemble to cast the votes that will elect the next president of these united states of america. we pray that each person casting a vote does so with a pure mind, heart, and soul seeking the very best and the highest good for the people of this great nation, economic stability, moral integrity, and the ability to lead the world as a true example of freedom and fairness. we pray for the president, that he may be strengthened daily by your grace, that he may constantly remember his calling as both a leader for and a servant of the people and that we, the citizens of these united states, those who have elected him might be his ever constant source of encouragement as he seeks to fulfill his duties and obligations. and finally, lord, we ask you to inspire all those who have been entrusted to elected office, that they may search deep within their hearts and find the way to work with one another and with the president for the good of this country, the world, and the c
. the lord bless you and keep you, the lord make his face shine one of you with favor, with god's peace. >> i move this meeting of the adjourned. >> is there a second? seconded. aye. opposed to the hearing no objection, i declare the meeting of the 53rd ohio electoral college be adjourned. >> today don fund discusses gun- control in light of the mass shooting of an elementary school. then more about gun-control with allison short. they will also talk about the house budget agenda and ways to avoid the fiscal cliff. -- allyson schwartz. + commodore of bills, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> one of the things that did surprise me a little, i did not conduct a nationwide survey of gun owners, but among people with gun -- guns the guys start with is very different. owner realizes when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for mos
lords that for every 2 cents of tax breaks oil and gas companies get wind and solar companies get $1. honorable mention pat buchanan? >> for person of the year, vladimir putin. you were right earlier john. it's a real comeback for him. he has been in power for a long time but he is holding on and i think there's a lot to this guy really and i think he is not an enemy of the united states. and he's not the greatest strategic threat. >> trade-off. >> mitt romney said. >> you can't go wrong. eleanor? >> congresswoman caroline mccarthy who has been working tirelessly on behalf of gun safety since winning her congressional seat after her husband was murdered in a shooting accident -- not accident, in a mass shooting incident on the long island railroad. she is now cosponsoring a bill to limit the size of assault magazines with a democratic congressman from colorado. it's going to force the issue in the house. >> mort? >> merka basically to this day saved the european common market. she has kept it going like nobody else could have and played the politics as you said before of her country
. i'm hoping that the message that the good lord has placed in my heart gives it a shot and a leap forward, that we'll have the opportunity to let the message of real hope and opportunity resonate in places where it hasn't been before. so i hope what john would say to me is celebrate for about 24 hours and get back to work. thank you all very much. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the house of representatives is in recess until 6:30 eastern tonight when the house comes back, we're expecting a vote on legislation that would allow natural gas pipeline permitting in glacier national park. that's live on espn. off the floor, negotiations continue on avoiding the tax increases an spending cuts scheduled to take effect in january. and on thursday, two congressional hearings, the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, at 9:00 they hear from deputy secretary of state william burns and the deputy of secretary of state for management and resources. they testify again thursday afternoon bef
-shirt. >> oh, lord. >> are they for sale? >> my question is for dave barry. howdy pronounced the letter between -- >> is very simple their 27 letters in the english alphabet. we all know. it is pronounced commences right here flagging the time pass the teeth and then back again to form a soft or hard flick it depending on the usage. >> we time it would be really fun to create a fake letter. five pages devoted to nonsense. the invisible person has a question. >> any other questions? >> sprint. come on. >> i'm sorry. >> this question is for dave. cooling off memory, two things. one, today really pay you have a vacation so you could write a book about it? how tall are you? palace want to be the tallest person in the room. i was wondering. >> they did pay me to write the book. that's kind of power works. yes. they give me money. i know that's weird. >> you are going on vacation. >> it was kind of like that. i was crying -- trying to describe it was actually like as opposed to learning facts about japan. the other thing, if i were in the room with you you would not be the tallest person. >> we have
out nunchakus. >> oh, lord, there was a real tension that i thought we had passed. anyhow, that was a very good piece that you all have no interest in. >> i have great interest. >> you do. you do. >> jonathan capehart -- >> they can have it all. >> they really can't. >> you suffer and sacrifice things that guys don't in terms of getting it all. >> i think women who make either decision do, and you're absolutely right but it's both sides of the debate. with that we don't agree on. >> we all care deeply, mika. we do. >> you would not have wanted to have been there at that moment with that lady on my street. you would have run away, shriveled up crying. >> jonathan capehart, we thank you so much for being with us. >> thank you. >> and we will see you soon. >> when we return, some of the most unforgettable moments of mitt romney's campaign for president. you are watching "morning joe." [ male announcer ] feeling like a shadow of your former self? c'mon, michael! get in the game! [ male announcer ] don't have the hops for hoops with your buddies? lost your appetite for romance?
years, savannah. i'm very attached to it. i was up all night to be honest with you. >> oh, good lord. >> it's a little unsettling. >> well, here you can see side by side before and after footage of ax. what do you think? a little dark on that left side. >>> lastly, lots of speculation about whom south carolina governor nikki haley will pick to fill jim demint's senate seat. our pal stephen colbert put his mind to it. >> but who will she pick? let's see, you want somebody young, somebody conservative, somebody from south carolina, maybe somebody who had a super pac. wait a second. watch where you point that thing. it's powerful. i know when i look at the u.s. senate, i say to myself, you know what they could use? another white guy. >> well, the governor responded on her facebook page saying, stephen, thank you for your interest in south carolina's u.s. senate seat and for the thousands of tweets you and your fans sent me, but you forget one thing, my friend. you didn't know our state drink. big, big mistake. well, she was referring to this from earlier this year. >> what's the state d
chateau overlooking nancy. it sounds so worldly which is how we wanted to think of ourselves, but lord, we were just children, sent by the government to fly airplanes and to save western europe from world war iii. we thought we had all the important things still left to do and were just playing at importance for the time being. it never occurred to us, living in our community of friends, having first babies, seeing husbands die, helping young widows pack to go home, that we had already started the important things. what could we have been thinking, or perhaps it's how could we have known that times get no better, that important things come without background music, that life is largely a matter of paying attention. >> "life comes without background music." >> which we raised on movies tend to think that when good things happen and things are good, there's great background music. >> choosing gratitude. why gratitude and why now? >> well, i guess it started with my increasing frustration about how polarized we are in the country. how much discontent there is. people ask me now, "how are you
in the -- >> socialistically. >> good lord. >> stephanie: okay. >> which is why we have single payer. >> stephanie: no we don't. jim in wisconsin you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi jim. >> caller: how you doing? >> stephanie: good. go ahead. >> caller: first time caller. my question is -- my subject would be i think it is about time now for term limits with the debacle that's going on in the senate. and also a line item veto. >> i don't know about term limits though because -- >> stephanie: let's term them to two years. >> there's something to be said for people on our side being the heads of committees. >> stephanie: you mean like elizabeth warren on the banking committee? ha ha! [ ♪ nah nah nah nah nah ♪ ] >> oh, scott brown has just gotta be going -- >> stephanie: this is the election that keeps on giving this holiday season. that and karl rowe and dick morris benched at fox news. [ ♪ nah nah nah nah nah ♪ ] >> producers have to get the direct approval of roger ailes before those two are booked on any show.
the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a philosophy seminar. what do we know and ho
about and you could see the reflection in england, permanent power in the monarch, property in the lords, numbers in the commons, an emerging independent judiciary. so i thought maybe not so easy to get a patent, even though i said it was a brilliant implementation. but federalism, clearly a unique contribution and in another place i said it was a unique contribution of the framers, a political theory. the framer had the idea you had more freedom if you have two governments instead of one, you almost get intellectual whiplash. why more freedom if you have two governments? 3 now, many students think of federalism as being a brilliant administrative device this was the biggest landmass since the roman empire to attempt a unified government and it took, what, six weeks to get from new england to south carolina. so if you're a businessperson or astute manager, you have territorial divisions in a certain sense. and in the 160's and 1970's when european states persons and scholars were looking at american federalism to see if they could find some lessons for the european union, many of them th
and joe biden, julia roberts and hillary clinton, madonna and colin powell. >> oh, lord, all those twosomes are unusual indeed. [sighs] and i am blanking on what thispc possibly could be. meredith, i'm question. meredith: no problem. question out of play. let's see the correct answer. julia roberts and hillary clinton. >> ok. meredith: now let's see what you jumped over. all the money's on the board. it could be any amount here. $1,000. not the worst-case scenario by any means. not bad. meredith: and by jumping over that money, you are one question closer to the million, now just 13 questions away."ancient tren "ancient trends" is the next category. finding 57 of them preserved on a 5,300-year-old mummy, scientists had to rethink the origins of what body decoration? tattoos, bracelets, piercings, necklaces. >> ha ha ha! tattoos. that makes sense if that's on a mummy. piercings would, too. my goodness. i'm not getting this one, either, meredith. i'm gonna have to jump this question. meredith: ok, we're gonna jump again. it's out of play. the right answer, please? the correct answer
the house of lords and a hereditary king and so, you look back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would sa
. good lord. down to the point of which it becomes a matter of major -- we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. you'll find alcohol for a lee the supreme court have -- you will find out how thoroughly the supreme court has but brick upon brick. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them come at any desire to tyrannize in . they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. we share that --, and planned to use think the united states -- what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french a might meant and the british and alignment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)